Tag Archives: Oppression

Book Review: Glass Sword by Victoria Aveyard

Glass SwordTitle: Glass Sword
Author: Victoria Aveyard
Series: Red Queen #2
Published: February 2016
Publisher: HarperTeen
Pages: 444
From: Barnes and Noble
Rating: 7/10

As a huge fan of fantasy, when I read young adult author Victoria Aveyard’s debut novel Red Queen, I had to know what happened next. In Aveyard’s novel Glass Sword, a young woman is accidentally thrown into a world of glittering jewels and magical powers in a futuristic take on the future of the United States.

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Book Review: The Kiss by Kathryn Harrison

The KissTitle: The Kiss
Author: Kathryn Harrison
Published: 1997
Publisher: Random House
Pages: 207
From: Drake Public Library

While I was reading Kathryn Harrison’s disturbing memoir, The Kiss, I was also reading several other books.

Those books were a lifesaver. They broke up the dark themes woven throughout the memoir I picked up at a local library booksale and kept me reading from a safe place.

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Book Review: Anthem by Ayn Rand

Title: Anthem
Author: Ayn Rand
Published: 1938, 1946
Publisher: Cassell, Pamphleteers, Inc.
Pages: 64
From: Barnes and Noble

There is something about a story that is short, thoughtful and just plain scary.

Ayn Rand, author of Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead, succeeds at telling a story that, if looked at in the right light, is a scary tale of political oppression and overcoming your feelings in a world where feelings don’t exist. This story is Anthem (1961).

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Book Review: His Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman

His Dark MaterialsTitle: His Dark Materials trilogy
Author: Philip Pullman
Published: 1995, 1997, 2000
Publisher: Scholastic
Pages: 432, 352, 544
From: Barnes and Noble
Rating: 9/10

Controversial books are always good reads. Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy, containing The Golden Compass (Northern Lights in the UK) (1995), The Subtle Knife (1997) and The Amber Spyglass (2000), uses different magical things to relate to religion in an unconventional way which leads to the epic battle.

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