NR’s Guide to Good Books

NR’s Guide to Good Books

Sherlock Holmes, Vol. 1The Non-Reader’s Guide to Good Books

While there are those that know a good book when they see one, there are also those that hate reading. Which is why I’ve asked my sister Breezy, someone that doesn’t enjoy reading like I do, to compile a list of her top 10 favorite books.

1. Rescuing Sprite, by Mark R. Levin

Published 2007

This short memoir tells the story of Mark Levin and his family and their journey through loving and letting go of their dog Sprite.

 

2. Thirteen Reasons Why, by Jay Asher

Published 2011

Be a witness alongside a boy named Clay as he discovers why his classmate and crush Hannah committed suicide through tapes she recorded and mailed to him.

 

3. The Sight, by David Clement-Davies

Published 2007

A pack of wolves set out to protect one of their own that possesses a great power of sight, a power an evil wolf seeks to take and use to control this world and the next.

 

4. It’s a Mall World After All, by Janette Rallison

Published 2008

Charlotte gets a job in the mall, and from there gossip turns to dilemma as she tries convincing her best friend of a deception.

 

5. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, by J.K. Rowling

Published 1999

A young boy in England discovers that he’s a wizard, and makes a life-changing decision that leads him on a dangerous and extraordinary adventure.

 

6. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, by Betty Smith

Published 1943

Told by the daughter of a poor family, this is the story of the family living in the Williamsburg slums in Brooklyn, as well as the story of relationships.

 

7. White Fang, by Jack London

Published 1906

This is the tale of a dog’s survival and turn to being domesticated, despite his wolf blood running through his veins.

 

8. Hound of the Baskervilles, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Published 1901-1902

The detective Sherlock Holmes thrusts himself within the mystery of the death of Sir Charles Baskerville: was he really killed by a gigantic ghostly dog that has been said to haunt his family? Or is there a logical explanation to the terror surrounding the Baskerville home?

 

9. Twilight, by Stephenie Meyer

Published 2006

A young girl moves to a small town, where she falls in love with a boy from school. But there is something unusual about him: he’s a vampire.

 

10. The Invention of Hugo Cabret, by Brian Selznick

Published 2007

An orphan boy living in a train station discovers a little machine boy, as well as the secrets the mechanical boy holds that link together the orphan boy, a tinker and his niece, and a silent film.

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